About ARINGO |
Our Unique Story

Two principles and one goal guide ARINGO’s work:

ARINGO’s roots were planted when our founder, Gil Levi, was accepted at Harvard, Wharton and INSEAD with a GMAT score of 650.

Gil received a full, merit-based scholarship at Wharton upon admission. He formed ARINGO’s methodology on the basis of the essay-writing tools that he originally developed as an MBA applicant.

ARINGO’s clients were accepted to top schools such as Harvard, Wharton, Duke, INSEAD, MIT, LBS and Kellogg with GMAT scores below 700.

Since its inception, ARINGO’s heavy investment in research (over 3,000 man hours and counting) has yielded a collection of invaluable resources for our clients. The Admission Driver System is perfect for application content outlining, the Tracker System for tracking document versions, and the Planner System for task scheduling.

In addition, ARINGO consultants have live access to the documents that all other consultants are working on. For example, when an ARINGO consultant works on a certain client essay, he or she can view how other consultants approached this essay – a fairly unique tool among admission consulting firms.

ARINGO employs a round table strategy, with each consultant collecting expert opinions at the critical decision points throughout the application process. The final product is always reviewed by a second consultant (at no additional cost) to introduce a fresh perspective and ensure that it meets ARINGO’s standard of excellence. The collaboration within ARINGO’s team, which includes former admission committee members as well as experienced consultants with marketing and writing skills, contributes to the success of our clients’ applications.

ARINGO was founded by Gil Levi (Wharton MBA 1999), is owned by Shimri Winters (London Business School MBA 2005) and is operated and managed by Chaya Pomeranz.

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